Richard Ries
All content copyright 2017 by R Ries Corporation. All rights reserved.

Homophily in Transformed

Lots of background is provided for this important concept in Transformed, from Aristotle and Plato to researchers from the 1950s through the 2000s. All of the material is set against Scripture. Much more information on the Christianity page.
Words. Images. Information. Just for you.

Blogs, Christianity

Posted: 8/16/17

Video: YouTube

Homophily

As Christians we know we are to love

everyone. But do we have to like

everyone? Science and Scripture agree

on the answer. Here’s a glimpse of

that answer; you’ll find much more in

chapter 4 of Transformed, Not

Conformed.

As Christians we know it’s wrong to hate. We know we are to love others, even our enemies. And we find no distinction in the type of love we are to have for others. When Jesus tells us to love our enemies in Matthew and to love other Christians in John, Scripture uses the same root word, agapaō, (Greek άγαπάω), defined in Thayer’s Greek Lexicon as “to welcome, to entertain, to be fond of, to love dearly.” But even if we manage to love everyone equally, the truth is we like some folks more than others. Is this okay? Turns out it is. We like to be around people like us. In fact, it’s perfectly normal and sociologists have a name for it: homophily. Scripture tells us that Jesus preferred the company of certain friends and acquaintances. Five passages in John refer to “the disciple He [Jesus] loved”; this disciple and Jesus were next to each other at the Last Supper. Among all His disciples, Jesus treated Peter, James, and John differently, often including them in His activities while excluding the others. Jesus clearly had special affection for Lazarus and his sisters, Mary and Martha, and visited them at their home in Bethany. Jesus wept at the news of the death Lazarus. Jesus was often in the presence of death but apparently wept only at the death of Lazarus. Homophily—liking people like us—forms the core of Christian fellowship. Remember that the writer of Hebrews says we are to not forsake the assembling of ourselves together. Homophily can compel us to hang around others who bring out the best in us. For sixty years Elisha was a great prophet due in large part to the seven or eight years he spent with the prophet Elijah as his mentor. But homophily can also compel us to hang around others who bring out the worst in us. Others like us may be like us in ways that shouldn’t be reinforced by spending time with them, so we need to be careful. Deuteronomy says this is true even if the other person is our son or daughter or wife. In first Corinthians Paul advises us to not associate with a sinner even if we consider him a brother. Proverbs summarizes it this way…”Whoever walks with the wise becomes wise, but the companion of fools will suffer harm.” Homophily can reinforce wisdom or foolishness, godliness or worldliness. We choose the outcome based on how we apply homophily in our lives. Want to know more? Check out Chapter 4: Assemble Together, in my book, Transformed, Not Conformed: Escaping worldliness to receive godliness. Available in print and as an ebook from Amazon.

Verses

Love our enemies—Matthew 5:44 Love other Christians—John 13:34 and 15:12 The disciple Jesus loved—John 13:23 (the scene of the Last Supper), 19:26, 20:2, 21:7, and 21:20. Preference for Peter, James and John—Mark 9:2, the Transfiguration; Mark 5:37, the raising of Jairus’s daughter from the dead; Mark 14:33, the Garden of Gethsemane; and Luke 22:8 where Jesus sends Peter and John to prepare the Passover meal, which we call the Last Supper. In the home of Mary and Martha—Luke 10:38-42. Jesus grieves at news of Lazarus’ death—John 11:1-44. Assembling of ourselves together—Hebrews 10:25. The story of Elisha the prophet—1 and 2 Kings. Avoid family members who would pull us away from God—Deuteronomy 13:6-8b Avoid a sinner we consider a brother—1 Corinthians 5:11. Walks with the wise or with fools—Proverbs 13:20; the text cites the ESV.

Images

In order of appearance; titles are my reference terms, not titles supplied by the photographers. Haiti—Madi Robson, licensed under Creative Commons, sourced from Unsplash. Overlook—Adrian, licensed under Creative Commons, sourced from Unsplash. Not forsake—Las Trampas NM, by  John Collier Jr. 1943, sourced from wikimedia commons. Bad idea—Hendrik Dacquin, sourced from flickr commons. Images used in the YouTube video were those above plus Jesus and His Disciples on the Sea of Galilee, Carl Oesterley (public domain), via Wikimedia Commons. Music: A Hoot, partnersinrhyme.com. Images in video on the Facebook page for the book (Transformed) were Haiti (above) and Like/Unlike by Tim Gouw, sourced from Unsplash, groups by the lake by Richard Ries and a shot of the print and e-versions of the book.
Buy Now Get your copy of Transformed today!
Richard Ries
All content, including images, copyright R Ries Corporation. All rights reserved.

Homophily in Transformed

Lots of background is provided for this important concept in Transformed, from Aristotle and Plato to researchers from the 1950s through the 2000s. All of the material is set against Scripture. Much more information on the Christianity page.

Blogs, Christianity

Posted: 8/16/17

Video: YouTube

Homophily

As Christians we know we are to love

everyone. But do we have to like

everyone? Science and Scripture agree

on the answer. Here’s a glimpse of

that answer; you’ll find much more in

chapter 4 of Transformed, Not

Conformed.

As Christians we know it’s wrong to hate. We know we are to love others, even our enemies. And we find no distinction in the type of love we are to have for others. When Jesus tells us to love our enemies in Matthew and to love other Christians in John, Scripture uses the same root word, agapaō, (Greek άγαπάω), defined in Thayer’s Greek Lexicon as “to welcome, to entertain, to be fond of, to love dearly.” But even if we manage to love everyone equally, the truth is we like some folks more than others. Is this okay? Turns out it is. We like to be around people like us. In fact, it’s perfectly normal and sociologists have a name for it: homophily. Scripture tells us that Jesus preferred the company of certain friends and acquaintances. Five passages in John refer to “the disciple He [Jesus] loved”; this disciple and Jesus were next to each other at the Last Supper. Among all His disciples, Jesus treated Peter, James, and John differently, often including them in His activities while excluding the others. Jesus clearly had special affection for Lazarus and his sisters, Mary and Martha, and visited them at their home in Bethany. Jesus wept at the news of the death Lazarus. Jesus was often in the presence of death but apparently wept only at the death of Lazarus. Homophily—liking people like us—forms the core of Christian fellowship. Remember that the writer of Hebrews says we are to not forsake the assembling of ourselves together. Homophily can compel us to hang around others who bring out the best in us. For sixty years Elisha was a great prophet due in large part to the seven or eight years he spent with the prophet Elijah as his mentor. But homophily can also compel us to hang around others who bring out the worst in us. Others like us may be like us in ways that shouldn’t be reinforced by spending time with them, so we need to be careful. Deuteronomy says this is true even if the other person is our son or daughter or wife. In first Corinthians Paul advises us to not associate with a sinner even if we consider him a brother. Proverbs summarizes it this way…”Whoever walks with the wise becomes wise, but the companion of fools will suffer harm.” Homophily can reinforce wisdom or foolishness, godliness or worldliness. We choose the outcome based on how we apply homophily in our lives. Want to know more? Check out Chapter 4: Assemble Together, in my book, Transformed, Not Conformed: Escaping worldliness to receive godliness. Available in print and as an ebook from Amazon.

Verses

Love our enemies—Matthew 5:44 Love other Christians—John 13:34 and 15:12 The disciple Jesus loved—John 13:23 (the scene of the Last Supper), 19:26, 20:2, 21:7, and 21:20. Preference for Peter, James and John—Mark 9:2, the Transfiguration; Mark 5:37, the raising of Jairus’s daughter from the dead; Mark 14:33, the Garden of Gethsemane; and Luke 22:8 where Jesus sends Peter and John to prepare the Passover meal, which we call the Last Supper. In the home of Mary and Martha—Luke 10:38-42. Jesus grieves at news of Lazarus’ death—John 11:1-44. Assembling of ourselves together—Hebrews 10:25. The story of Elisha the prophet—1 and 2 Kings. Avoid family members who would pull us away from God—Deuteronomy 13:6-8b Avoid a sinner we consider a brother—1 Corinthians 5:11. Walks with the wise or with fools—Proverbs 13:20; the text cites the ESV.

Images

In order of appearance; titles are my reference terms, not titles supplied by the photographers. Haiti—Madi Robson, licensed under Creative Commons, sourced from Unsplash. Overlook—Adrian, licensed under Creative Commons, sourced from Unsplash. Not forsake—Las Trampas NM, by  John Collier Jr. 1943, sourced from wikimedia commons. Bad idea—Hendrik Dacquin, sourced from flickr commons. Images used in the YouTube video were those above plus Jesus and His Disciples on the Sea of Galilee, Carl Oesterley (public domain), via Wikimedia Commons. Music: A Hoot, partnersinrhyme.com. Images in video on the Facebook page for the book (Transformed) were Haiti (above) and Like/Unlike by Tim Gouw, sourced from Unsplash, groups by the lake by Richard Ries and a shot of the print and e-versions of the book.
Words. Images. Information. Just for you.
Buy Now Get your copy of Transformed, Not Conformed today!