Richard Ries
All content copyright 2017 by R Ries Corporation. All rights reserved.

My selfish reason

I must admit: I derive value from details. I’m a rigorous writer. What I produce is the result of my own research. My content is unique. I cannot create this original, unique content from generic information. I may lift content from existing sources to create captions, cutlines and sometimes sidebars, but the bodies of my articles and client projects are original content. If I’m to maintain the reputation I’ve earned in more than three decades of creating high- value content, I need to work with details.
Words. Images. Information. Just for you.

Blogs, heavy equipment

Posted: 8/16/17

Video: coming soon

Details

OEMs have to include details in the

information they provide to the media

because details deliver value.

Details matter and whether I’m creating marketing material for a client or a feature article for an editor, I rely heavily on details. Delivering content built on details provides value to the client, the editor, the reader and everyone else who comes in contact with the finished product. Here’s an overview of some key value propositions. Details yield value to consumers of content, whether that  consumption takes place via print or online or another medium. Generic is lazy and lazy gets lost. “With the new model we increased power and enhanced operator comfort.” That’s a fine intro, but without details it’s a lazy effort. Consumers recognize it as such, assign no importance to it and because it has no value to them they make no effort to commit it to memory. They throw it onto the heap that is their mental landfill of valueless information. Details are required by today’s consumers. As marketing consultant Jake Sorofman said in The New York Times, “Consumers are certainly becoming more savvy, more skeptical, more discriminating…They expect a lot more, and that’s putting pressure on marketers to do better.” Perhaps most importantly, details deliver value to the companies who provide those details, whether OEMs, dealers/distributors, third-party suppliers, aftermarket providers, or others. Details quantify and clarify broad claims (“more power,” “lower O&O costs,” “quieter operator environment,” etc.). Details differentiate a company’s products and services from those of other companies. Details add credibility and minimize skepticism. There is no downside to providing details. Not all details carry equal weight. It’s my job to craft meaningful content from a host of details of varying value. The result might be something like: To preserve the excellent fuel efficiency of the EL650-D, engine horsepower was increased only 7 percent. But that conservative power increase coupled with the machine’s new, advanced hydraulics delivers a 17 percent increase in bucket breakout force and a 23 percent increase in lifting capacity. Providing details may seem burdensome. Perhaps subject matter experts are weary of repeating the same numbers to one media person after another after another after another. Maybe SMEs are reluctant to cite specifics for fear they don’t have the latest values and they don’t want to risk being responsible for sharing outdated information. None of this changes the fact that details are essential if we are to provide content with value.

Images

In order of appearance; titles are my reference terms, not titles supplied by the photographers. Measurement—Fleur Treurniet, licensed under Creative Commons, sourced from Unsplash. Magnified—Ismail Yanim, licensed under Creative Commons, sourced from Unsplash. Moldboard—Richard Ries. Images in the YouTube video were provided by OEMs for articles I’ve worked on this year (2017). These OEMs are ASV, Case, Caterpillar, Ditch Witch, Doosan, John Deere, Komatsu, Vermeer and Wacker-Neuson.
Richard Ries
All content, including images, copyright R Ries Corporation. All rights reserved.

My selfish reason

I must admit: I derive value from details. I’m a rigorous writer. What I produce is the result of my own research. My content is unique. I cannot create this original, unique content from generic information. I may lift content from existing sources to create captions, cutlines and sometimes sidebars, but the bodies of my articles and client projects are original content. If I’m to maintain the reputation I’ve earned in more than three decades of creating high- value content, I need to work with details.

Blogs, heavy equipment

Posted: 8/16/17

Video: coming soon

Details

OEMs have to include details in the

information they provide to the media

because details deliver value.

Details matter and whether I’m creating marketing material for a client or a feature article for an editor, I rely heavily on details. Delivering content built on details provides value to the client, the editor, the reader and everyone else who comes in contact with the finished product. Here’s an overview of some key value propositions. Details yield value to consumers of content, whether that  consumption takes place via print or online or another medium. Generic is lazy and lazy gets lost. “With the new model we increased power and enhanced operator comfort.” That’s a fine intro, but without details it’s a lazy effort. Consumers recognize it as such, assign no importance to it and because it has no value to them they make no effort to commit it to memory. They throw it onto the heap that is their mental landfill of valueless information. Details are required by today’s consumers. As marketing consultant Jake Sorofman said in The New York Times, “Consumers are certainly becoming more savvy, more skeptical, more discriminating…They expect a lot more, and that’s putting pressure on marketers to do better.” Perhaps most importantly, details deliver value to the companies who provide those details, whether OEMs, dealers/distributors, third-party suppliers, aftermarket providers, or others. Details quantify and clarify broad claims (“more power,” “lower O&O costs,” “quieter operator environment,” etc.). Details differentiate a company’s products and services from those of other companies. Details add credibility and minimize skepticism. There is no downside to providing details. Not all details carry equal weight. It’s my job to craft meaningful content from a host of details of varying value. The result might be something like: To preserve the excellent fuel efficiency of the EL650-D, engine horsepower was increased only 7 percent. But that conservative power increase coupled with the machine’s new, advanced hydraulics delivers a 17 percent increase in bucket breakout force and a 23 percent increase in lifting capacity. Providing details may seem burdensome. Perhaps subject matter experts are weary of repeating the same numbers to one media person after another after another after another. Maybe SMEs are reluctant to cite specifics for fear they don’t have the latest values and they don’t want to risk being responsible for sharing outdated information. None of this changes the fact that details are essential if we are to provide content with value.

Images

In order of appearance; titles are my reference terms, not titles supplied by the photographers. Measurement—Fleur Treurniet, licensed under Creative Commons, sourced from Unsplash. Magnified—Ismail Yanim, licensed under Creative Commons, sourced from Unsplash. Moldboard—Richard Ries. Images in the YouTube video were provided by OEMs for articles I’ve worked on this year (2017). These OEMs are ASV, Case, Caterpillar, Ditch Witch, Doosan, John Deere, Komatsu, Vermeer and Wacker-Neuson.
Words. Images. Information. Just for you.